What is
Lunch & Learn?
Wednesdays
12:00 Noon to 1:00pm


WNMU, ABC Room (First Floor) of the Besse-Forward Global Resource Center (GRC)
12th Street, Silver City.
(unless otherwise noted)

FREE and Open-to-the-Public

Lunch and Learn is potpourri of learning experiences that demonstrates the "diversity university" WILL has become.

Bring a friend, a "brown bag" lunch and an inquisitive mind. Be ready to enjoy a new learning experience every week.
 
LUNCH & LEARN - 2015        print this page
LOCATION:
WNMU, Global Resource Center, ABC Room (first floor)
(unless otherwise noted in the event description)
DAY/TIME:
WEDNESDAYS, 12 NOON to 1:00 p.m.

FREE and Open-to-the-Public.

TO OPEN OR CLOSE A COURSE DESCRIPTION
CLICK ON THE COURSE TITLE.

THE ARCHITECTURE OF POLITICS
How international, national, and even local events can create architectural projects that have significant effects on the budget, design and scheduling of those project. Examples will be drown from Texas, the Middle East, and even our own Silver City.

Jim Redford has been practicing residential and commercial architecture and planning for 50 years. After growing up in Lordsburg, Jim graduated from Rice University in Houston and began his career with the largest architectural firm at the time in Houston, specializing in university planning, programming and design. He moved to Dallas and started his own firm, and in 1989 he returned to New Mexico and relocated his practice to Silver City.
Presenter: Jim Redford
SEPTEMBER 16
Location: WNMU Global Resource Center, ABC Room
NATIONAL CEMETERIES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT
This presentation will include a history of the national cemetery system, an overview of the cemeteries of today, and an explanation as to who is eligible for burial and how that process works. A representative of the National Cemetery Administration will be available to respond to general questions about eligibility, or about the status of Fort Bayard National Cemetery.

Over a ten-year period, Lindee Lenox worked for the National Cemetery Administration (NCA) of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In the last of her three management positions, she was Associate Director of Field Programs with the Senior Executive Service of the VA, dealing with operations of all 132 VA National Cemeteries, including that of Ft. Bayard. She moved to Silver City upon retirement in 2011.
Presenter: Lindee Lenox
SEPTEMBER 23
Location: WNMU Global Resource Center, ABC Room
TEACHING ENGLISH IN MARTIN, SLOVAKIA: AN INSIDER'S VIEW
Jeannine and Gary Jenks share their experiences teaching English in Martin, Slovakia, a city of about 50,000 people. For a full year, beginning in July, 2010, Jeannine taught English to 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade students, while Gary taught conversational English at the University. The Jenks will recount their interactions with the Slovak people, with whom they celebrated their holidays and attended their festivals, all of which played out against a backdrop of ancient castles, churches, folk music, and dancing.

Gary and Jeannine Jenks moved to Silver City almost four years ago. Both graduated from NMSU. Gary has a degree in Business Management with a minor in Economics. He also has an MBA. He has a long career in Business, including Accounting. Jeannine has a Bilingual Elementary Credential. She has had a long career teaching Kindergarten through third grades. They went on three short mission trips to Martin, Slovakia, during which they taught conversational English. When retired from their respective careers, they spent a year in Slovakia.
Presenters: Jeannine and Gary Jenks
SEPTEMBER 30
Location: WNMU Global Resource Center, ABC Room
WHY BIRDS ARE REPTILES
Given what is known of the evolutionary relationships of vertebrates, and the conventions of the modern system of biological classification, birds are reptiles. In an evolutionary sense, birds are "nested" within Reptilia, which means that Ornithology is now simply a minor sub-discipline within herpetology, and we herpetologists no longer need to be apologetic for having an interest in these small, feathered, "warm-blooded," volant reptiles. In support of these assertions, evidence from paleontology, comparative anatomy, and molecular biology will be presented.

Julian Lee was born in San Antonio and grew up in Bloomington, Indiana and San Francisco, California. He studied biology at UC-Davis, took a master's at San Diego State, and his PhD at the University of Kansas. During his undergraduate years he was a seasonal employee with the U. S. Forest Service, working on a hot shot firefighting crew in southern California. He taught biology at the University of Miami for thirty years and is author of two books on the amphibians and reptiles of the Yucatan Peninsula, both published by Cornell University Press. He and his wife, Dr. Lynn Haugen, a fellow biologist, moved to Silver City in 2006.
Presenter: Julian Lee
OCTOBER 7
Location: WNMU Global Resource Center, ABC Room
WAR & PEACE: THE RUSSO-JAPANESE CONFLICT OF 1904-1905 - CAUSES & CONSEQUENCES
The Russo-Japanese War (1904-05) highlighted Japan's emergence as a serious regional, if not global power, at a time when the Great Powers of Europe were engaged in a naval arms race. At the same time, these countries were pursuing various territorial objectives. Ethnic bias may have played a part in the reluctant acceptance of Japan's rising status. President Theodore Roosevelt's role in settling the Russo-Japanese conflict earned him the Nobel Peace Prize, and bolstered US influence in world affairs.

Bill and Caroline Baldwin moved to Silver City from Massachusetts two decades ago. Bill graduated from Harvard College, majoring in linguistics and near eastern languages, and pursued an international business career in Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. Later Bill and Caroline both earned master's degrees in library and information science at Simmons College in Boston. In Silver City they have been active in local nonprofits and musical groups. They have three children and four grandchildren.
Presenter: Bill Baldwin
OCTOBER 14
Location: WNMU Global Resource Center, ABC Room
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY — THE PAST FIFTY YEARS
From the giddy heights of post-war dominance, through the tense Cold War, and into the present age of sobering new international dynamics, U.S. foreign policy has had to morph constantly. Realities have changed drastically, as have the important actors and issues on the international stage. In an hour Rick Sherman will try to describe what these changes have wrought for American life — and perhaps speculate on where the "new realities" will take us.

Rick Sherman is a retired career diplomat who spent nearly four decades in US State Department assignments in various parts of the world. His career (1966-2003) covered a period of American history in which our foreign policies shifted from the post-World War II predominance through dramatic changes in world power structures: the disastrous Asian land war, the opening of China, violent wars in the Middle East, and the fall of the USSR and international communism. Rick has also worked as editor-in-chief of an American publication on African politics, and as a wine consultant. Rick and Sue Sherman settled in Silver City in 2003, where he has taught several WILL courses on domestic and international politics.
Presenter: Rick Sherman
OCTOBER 21
Location: WNMU Global Resource Center, ABC Room